Nevada Association of Employers’ survey shows increase in blue-collar wages | nnbw.com

Nevada Association of Employers’ survey shows increase in blue-collar wages

Special to the NNBW

LAS VEGAS – The Nevada Association of Employers (NAE) published the results from its 2017 Nevada Pay Survey, showing more than a 10 percent salary increase in select blue-collar positions compared to 2012.

Overall, the 2017 report has shown an increase of more than 3 percent in the average base pay of management, exempt and non-exempt positions for the previous 12 months.

NAE's annual survey contains data from 75 Nevada employers and more than 8,000 employees intended to measure pay rates and practices throughout the state. The results reflect a rising trend for Nevada's blue-collar workers in jobs such as a production assembly worker, mechanical assembler, production lead person and automated machine operator.

"From the study, we are seeing an upward climb in wages, particularly in entry-level positions, even though pay has been relatively stagnant in Nevada," said Thoran Towler, NAE chief executive officer. "Overall, the results show that local businesses are seeking to remain competitive in order to retain workers and hire new ones, which is a turning point for economic growth."

NAE's survey shows that among select blue-collar jobs that saw an increase from 2012 to 2017, the average pay increase during this time was 12 percent for a production assembly worker, more than 13 percent for a mechanical assembler, nearly 15 percent for an automated machine operator, and nearly 11 percent for a production lead person.

NAE's data summary provides a composite of all pay data reported for a job title based on company size, geographic region and industry, including manufacturing and production, retail and wholesale trade, services, health care, and hotel and restaurant and gaming. The study includes the number of responding companies, number of employees, simple and weighted averages, pay ranges, and variable (or bonus) pay, if any.

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