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Glenn Group spins off sister gaming company

Anne Knowles
aknowles@nnbw.biz

The Glenn Group is spinning off a subsidiary agency to focus on gaming clients.

The Reno and Las Vegas-based marketing and public relations firm last week launched Wide Awake, an agency working exclusively with gaming businesses, including casino resorts, manufacturers of equipment and creators of gaming applications.

“This allows us to dive a lot deeper into that category. We have been working in gaming for 45 years with well over 50 — more like 70 — properties,” says B.C. LeDoux, president and partner of Wide Awake. “We see a real opportunity. The environment is hyper competitive and over saturated. Everyone has to fight for their space and need to differentiate themselves to a greater degree. They have to be less like a commodity and more of a unique experience.”

LeDoux says Wide Awake will be working with clients on modern marketing, or marketing via social media, digital, print and television. That includes new user experience ideas, such as smart phone apps that ping a user as she walks by a resort restaurant to invite her in for the daily special.

The Glenn Group already works with gaming clients across the country, but LeDoux says Wide Awake will likely expand into even more geographic areas.

The agency will share offices with The Glenn Group in both Reno and Las Vegas, where LeDoux is based.

Wide Awake takes its name from gold rush days when towns with gambling, before gambling was legal, were known as wide awake.

LeDoux says The Glenn Group decided to create a second agency for gaming because the trend in the marketing is towards customization.

“You can specialize in several ways. You can have a narrow what or a narrow who and Wide Awake is a narrow who,” says LeDoux.

In other words, agencies can focus on a single service, such as social media strategies, or on a single industry, such as gaming.

Driving the trend, says LeDoux, are customers.

“Clients want specialists,” he says.


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