UPDATE: Nevada OSHA’s July 2 sweep of businesses shows decreasing mask compliance | nnbw.com
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UPDATE: Nevada OSHA’s July 2 sweep of businesses shows decreasing mask compliance

NNBW staff report
Hunter Kitzmiller prepares to pour creamer in a customer’s drinks at Coffeebar in Reno’s midtown on June 17.
Photo: Kaleb M. Roedel / NNBW

UPDATE — 11:30 a.m. Friday, July 3:

The Nevada Division of Industrial Relations issued an updated press release late Friday morning that indicates the number of Southern Nevada businesses in compliance with Gov. Sisolak’s mask order is decreasing.

Of the 204 state-wide businesses observed on July 2, 49 percent complied with the face covering requirements, according to a press release.

“Fifty percent of the 180 bars and restaurant bar areas visited by officials were found to be in compliance, with the remaining establishments including automobile sales and maintenance, gyms, hair and nail establishments, and tattoo shops demonstrating a 61 percent rate of compliance,” the press release reports.

Since enforcement of the governor’s mask directive began June 26, the overall business compliance rate is 85% in Northern Nevada and 65% in Southern Nevada. Business sectors with the highest rates of statewide noncompliance include:

  • home improvement stores, 61 percent noncompliance
  • bars, 48 percent noncompliance
  • grocery stores, 40 percent noncompliance
  • casino hotels, 33 percent noncompliance

More than 850 observations have been conducted in gaming establishments, bars, restaurants, casino hotels, gyms, hair and nail salons, automobile sales and maintenance establishments, grocery stores, home improvement stores, clothing stores and other locations where large groups of people may be congregating for longer periods of time, which can lead to a heightened risk of spreading COVID-19.

“Future observation and inspection activity may target industries and business establishments that demonstrate high rates of noncompliance or those where high volumes of complaints have been received by Nevada OSHA,” according to the release.

The original story from Friday morning is below:

Roughly 25% of businesses in and around Las Vegas were found not complying with Gov. Sisolak’s June 24 order for people to use face coverings in public places to stem the spread of COVID-19, officials said July 2.

Statewide, mask compliance was about 80% since the order took effect June 26, according to Nevada OSHA. That was after about 650 site visits conducted as of July 1, according to a press release from the Nevada Division of Industrial Relations.

That day alone, OSHA went to nearly 350 places statewide. Officials report that while Southern Nevada sites had a 75% compliance rate, Northern Nevada businesses came in at 84%.

According to the state, if non-compliance is found, the business is given a warning. If a violation is found a second time, a notice of citation and penalty will be issued.

The maximum penalty that can be assessed is $134,940. Complaints can be filed with Nevada OSHA online at osha.gov/pls/osha7.

According to the Associated Press, agency officials did not immediately say whether any fines have been issued to non-compliant businesses.

The July 2 news comes after a report one day prior from the Nevada Division of Industrial Relations that indicated of 259 Nevada businesses surveyed prior to July 1, 85.3% were complying with the mask order.

According to the state, OSHA are conducting observations at large and small retail establishments across the state, including grocery stores, home improvement stores, clothing stores, gyms, hair and nail salons, “and other locations where large groups of people may be congregating for longer periods of time, which can lead to a heightened risk of spreading COVID-19.”

More inspections, including those at casino and gambling properties, are expected over the Fourth of July holiday weekend.

“Ensuring compliance with the governor’s directives and guidance issued by Nevada OSHA is a vital component of ensuring the health and safety of Nevada’s workers and helping businesses stay open,” Victoria Carreon, Division of Industrial Relations Interim Administrator, said in a statement. “The Division of Industrial Relations is taking a proactive and cooperative approach by canvasing businesses to make them aware of the requirements before taking enforcement action.”