Sparks-based company introduces digital-scent technology to identify hazardous gases | nnbw.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Sparks-based company introduces digital-scent technology to identify hazardous gases

University of Nevada, Reno
Jim Stockdale, hardware engineering manager at NevadaNano, shows how the company’s gas sensor product has shrunk from a metal framed device, background, to tiny circular size, foreground.
Bill O’Driscoll/NNBW

Building on discoveries made at and licensed from the University of Nevada, Reno, NevadaNano has developed the digital-scent technology to detect and accurately identify hazards such as explosive, toxic or carcinogenic gases. NevadaNano’s newest sensors leverage the University-developed technology and detect trace levels of gases at a lower price point and with high levels of performance.

NevadaNano on Monday announced its recent developments that will allow this advanced-manufacturing company based in Sparks to deliver new sensors that can be distributed in homes, offices and outdoors to monitor exposure to hazardous gases and enable people to take action to protect health.

Participating in the announcement were Ralph Whitten, NevadaNano president; Mridul Gautam, university vice president Research & Innovation; Ellen Purpus, university assistant vice president for Enterprise & Innovation; and other representatives of NevadaNano, the university and Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada.

Technology and product development happening at NevadaNano has implications for the regional economy and for safety in industrial and home settings:

  • NevadaNano is creating high-tech jobs in northern Nevada. The NevadaNano team consists of 39 employees and contractors (37 full-time and two part-time), and includes many alumni of the University. Of the 20 engineers at NevadaNano, 12 are alumni of the University’s College of Engineering.
  • NevadaNano’s digital-scent technology enables accurate detection and identification of a variety of explosive, toxic or carcinogenic gases, and this contributes to improved safety in many settings including workplaces, homes and cars.